Moscow Mule

  • 2 oz Vodka
  • .5 oz Lime Juice
  • 4.5 oz Ginger Beer

Garnish:  1 Lime Wheel

Glass:  Collins or Copper Mug

Tools:  Bar Spoon

Preparation:  Pour the vodka and the lime juice into a collins glass.  Add large ice cubes.  Pour ginger beer over ice.  Stir.  Garnish with a lime wheel.

This recipe is from the Speakeasy book by Jason Kosmas and Dushan Zaric of Employees Only in New York City.   Other recipes I found online have variations that call for half the lime juice and add 1 tsp simple syrup, while many also include a mint sprig for garnish.

The story behind the creation of the drink is interesting, particularly in light of the dominance of Vodka in modern times.  Back in the 1950’s, vodka was a total non-factor with the American public and the owner of Smirnoff (who was actually an American man named John G. Martin from Connecticut that got his vodka recipe from a man named Pierre Smirnoff who was from Paris, not Russia) got together with the owner of a Hollywood bar called the Cock n’ Bull, who had produced a ton of ginger beer that no one was buying.  These two businessmen combined two products that weren’t selling, put them into a promotional copper cup, and marketed the hell out of the drink to bartender’s across the country.  Bartenders hated it, but the public loved it and with it the great American Vodka Craze began.

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French Open

  • .75 oz Lillet Blanc
  • .5 oz Honey Syrup
  • .5 oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 2 Fresh Raspberries
  • Prosecco/Sparkling Wine (the drier the better)

Garnish:  Fresh Raspberry

Glass:  Flute

Tools:  Mixing Glass, Muddler, Cocktail Shaker, Hawthorne Strainer, Fine Strainer, Bar Spoon

Preparation:  Muddle fresh raspberries in the base of the mixing glass.  Add the remaining ingredients, except the sparkling wine, and shake with ice in a cocktail shaker.  Double strain into a chilled flute.  Top with sparkling wine and stir gently to combine.  Garnish with a fresh raspberry.

This is a recipe from Imbibe Magazine and is attributed to Bryan Dayton of Oak at Fourteenth in Boulder, Colorado.

Amaretto Sour

  • 1.5 oz Amaretto
  • .75 oz Cask-Proof Bourbon (such as Booker’s)
  • 1 oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 tsp Rich Simple Syrup
  • .5 oz Fresh Egg White, Beaten

Garnish: Lemon Peel and Brandied Cherry

Glass:  Old Fashioned

Tools:  Mixing Glass, Cocktail Shaker, Hawthorne Strainer

Preparation:  Combine ingredients in a mixing glass and dry shake in a cocktail shaker.  Add ice to cocktail shaker and shake well.  Strain into an old fashioned glass over ice.  Garnish with a lemon peel and brandied cherry.

This is a recipe from Imbibe Magazine and is attributed to Jeffrey Morgenthaler of Clyde Common in Portland, Oregon.  It varies from the traditional recipe by adding bourbon, rich simple syrup and egg white.

Parisian Negroni

  • 1 oz Cognac
  • 1 oz Punt e Mes
  • 1 oz Campari
  • 1tsp St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram

Garnish:  Orange Twist

Glass:  Old Fashioned

Tools:  Mixing Glass, Bar Spoon, Julep Strainer

Preparation:  Combine ingredients in an ice-filled mixing glass.  Stir for 30 seconds.  Strain into an old fashioned glass over ice.  Twist a swath of orange peel over the drink and use as a garnish.

This is a recipe from Imbibe Magazine and is attributed to Michael Flannery of Michael’s in New York City.

Ce Soir

  • 1.5 oz Cognac
  • .75 oz Cynar
  • .5 oz Yellow Chartreuse
  • 1 dash Orange Bitters
  • 1 dash Angostura Bitters

Garnish:  Lemon Peel

Glass:  Old Fashioned

Tools:  Mixing Glass, Bar Spoon, Julep Strainer

Preparation:  Combine ingredients in an ice-filled mixing glass.  Stir for 30 seconds.  Strain into an old fashioned glass neat.  Twist a swath of lemon peel over the drink and discard.

This is a recipe from Imbibe Magazine and is attributed to Nicole Lebedevitch of The Hawthorne in Boston.